Saugerties

Where History Embraces The Future

By   |   Community Spotlight

If you’re not careful, the bluestone sidewalks in Saugerties will trip you up. It’s no wonder the stones are uneven; they’ve been walked on for more than a century, and were pulled directly from the quarries located north of Saugerties’ Main Street. Since then, the roots of the stately, venerable old trees that line the village streets have pushed up the bluestone into mounds in some places, making them precarious to navigate, particularly if you’re busy gawking at the pristine period architecture that’s located around every corner in this Ulster County village.

It’s hard not to look, though. The well-preserved homes and commercial buildings situated in the village hearken back to a time when streets were once muddy and rough, when horses and buggies bounced along on them instead of cars and motorcycles. Times have changed, but many of the businesses in Saugerties have stubbornly, tenaciously remained. The village has also seen an influx of new businesses and fine dining, and has plenty of great houses available on the market.

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OLD MINGLING WITH NEW

In the village, long-standing businesses provide a direct link to Saugerties’s past while co-existing peacefully with their newer neighbors. The same goes for residential properties: Grand Victorians stand next to newly constructed homes in the village, where they are interspersed with 1920s Craftsman bungalows and 1960s brick ranch-style homes. However, we offer a word of caution to buyers: One thing that the village properties have in common is high property taxes. While listing prices may seem competitive, your monthly tax bill could price you right out of the village. There is good news, though: Outside of the village in the Town of Saugerties, fixer-uppers rub elbows with stately mansions and sprawling, modern properties, while the taxes remain much lower than in the village. While you do trade the convenience of village life for a more rural setting, your bottom line may thank you in the long run.

THE DRAW OF SAUGERTIES

If there’s one person who knows Saugerties like the back of her own hand, it’s Saugerties Town Supervisor Kelly Myers. She’s intimately familiar with what makes the town and village so attractive to visitors and residents alike. “People are drawn to Saugerties by our festivals and special events,” explains Myers. “They get a little taste of what living in an authentic hometown feels like. It tugs their heartstrings and reminds them of the warmth of their favorite childhood days. That’s why they keep coming back.” Heartstring tugging aside, Myers understands that there has to be more to a town than sentimentality to keep it lively. “There’s something wonderfully familiar about Saugerties,” she says, “and yet we have enough variety to pique the interest of a trendier crowd, too.”

Additionally, Saugerties is located right o of the New York State Thruway, which makes it attractive to those looking to commute or experience upstate living part time. For those with school-age kids, it’s helpful to check out websites like GreatSchools.com to get the skinny on the public school system. There, the Saugerties Central Schools rating currently sits at an iffy 5 out of 10, with Saugerties Senior High School scoring the highest marks at a very average 7 out of 10. Fret not: If you’re looking for something a little better,  Woodstock Day School is not far away. Nevertheless, Saugerties is a successful blend of old and new businesses, architecture, and fun, particularly in the summertime, when things really get hopping. Just watch your step on the sidewalks. After all, the beauty of Saugerties can be quite distracting.

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